Quentin Tarantino on Uma Thurman’s Kill Bill car crash: “It was one of the biggest regrets of my life”

Quentin Tarantino has finally broken his silence on the car crash involving Uma Thurman on the set of Kill Bill 15 years ago.

The car crash happened as a result of Quentin Tarantino “pressuring” her to drive a stunt car, which she said she wasn’t comfortable driving. It left the actress with permanent injuries, and the director described it as “one of the biggest regrets” of his life.

Uma Thurman spoke of the car crash which left her with “a permanently damaged neck” and “screwed-up knees” in her New York Times interview – where she also detailed being sexually assaulted by Harvey Weinstein in a London hotel.

Uma was previously denied footage of the crash, as the studio reportedly feared a lawsuit, but it was recently retrieved by Quentin Tarantino so that the actress could finally get closure.

“She wanted clarity on what happened in that car crash, after all these years,” Quentin Tarantino told Deadline.

“She asked, could I get her the footage? I had to find it, 15 years later.

“I didn’t think we were going to be able to find it. It was clear and it showed the crash and the aftermath. I was very happy to get it to Uma.”

Uma Thurman shared the video footage of the crash on social media, and said that she didn’t believe Quentin Tarantino had withheld it maliciously.

“Quentin Tarantino, was deeply regretful and remains remorseful about this sorry event, and gave me the footage years later so I could expose it and let it see the light of day, regardless of it most likely being an event for which justice will never be possible.

“The circumstances of this event were negligent to the point of criminality. I do not believe though with malicious intent,” she captioned the post.

“Quentin Tarantino, was deeply regretful and remains remorseful about this sorry event, and gave me the footage years later so I could expose it and let it see the light of day, regardless of it most likely being an event for which justice will never be possible.

“He also did so with full knowledge it could cause him personal harm, and I am proud of him for doing the right thing and for his courage.”

Tarantino went into further detail with Deadline about the situation involving the car crash.

“I start hearing from the production manager, Bennett Walsh, that Uma is trepidatious about doing the driving shot,” he said.

“None of us ever considered it a stunt. It was just driving. None of us looked at it as a stunt. Maybe we should have, but we didn’t.

“Me and Uma had our issues about the crash. She blamed me for the crash and she had a right to blame me for the crash.

“That is one of the biggest regrets of my life. As a director, you learn things and sometimes you learn them through horrendous mistake”

“I didn’t mean to do it. I talked her into getting in the car, I assured her the road was safe. And it wasn’t. The car might even have been dubious too even if I didn’t know that then. We had our issues about it.

The director concluded by saying the accident taught him a valuable lesson, and it still remains as one of the “biggest regrets” of his life…

“That is one of the biggest regrets of my life. As a director, you learn things and sometimes you learn them through horrendous mistakes,” he concluded.

“That was one of my most horrendous mistakes, that I didn’t take the time to run the road, one more time, just to see what I would see.”